Cureality Proficiency Certifications and Awards X
Inner Circle Forums


Portions of the Undoctored Inner Circle Member Forum and its vast wealth of knowledge, are available only to our Members.
Becoming an Inner Circle Member will allow you to post topics, ask Dr. Davis questions, and view all replies.


Taking Calcium Supplements Causes Brain Lesions

Inner Circle Member Forum >> Osteopenia & Osteoporosis Protocol >> Taking Calcium Supplements Causes Brain Lesions

searcher7

No Avatar

Join Date: 12/7/2009
Posts Contributed: 2093
Total Likes: 332
Recommends Recd: 5
Ignores Issued: 0
Certs & Awards: 39   view

Likes Recd: 0
 
Posted: 4/3/2015 6:06:37 AM
 
Dr Davis warned us long ago not to take calcium supplements for bone health because arterial calcification can take place.
A recent study has another warning:

A truly provocative study on this topic published last year in the British Journal of Nutrition somehow slipped through the cracks, because not only did we miss it but we do not recall it being reported elsewhere. Titled, "Elevated brain lesion volumes in older adults who use calcium supplements: a cross-sectional clinical observational study," the study looked at the possibility that since calcium supplements have now been linked in multiple studies with vascular pathologies associated with cardiovascular disease they may also be associated with the occurrence of brain lesions (known on MRI scans as hyperintensities) in older adults. These brain lesions, visible as brighter spots in MRI scans, are known to be caused by lack of blood flow (ischemia) and subsequent neurological damage.
According to the study,

"Brain lesions,also known as hyperintensities, are areas of damage observed on brain MRI (See Above). These lesions are common in older adults and increase the risk of devastating health outcomes, including depression, cognitive decline, dementia, stroke, physical disability, hip fracture and death. Postmortem studies have determined that these lesions form primarily due to ischemia, especially larger lesions (.3mm) and lesions found in depressed individuals."

The observational study enrolled 227 older adults (60 years above) and assessed food and supplemental calcium intakes. Participants with supplemental calcium use above zero were categorized as supplement users. Lesion volumes were assessed with MRI scans.

Key findings were:

  • Greater lesion volumes were found among calcium supplement users than non-users

  • The influence of calcium supplements was of a magnitude similar to that of the influence of high blood pressure (hypertension), "a well-established risk factor for lesions."

  • The study found that the amount of calcium used was not associated with lesion volume and that "even low-dose supplements, by older adults may be associated with greater lesion volumes."

  • Even after controlling for food calcium intake, age, sex, race, years of education, energy intake, depression and hypertension, the association between calcium supplement and lesion volumes held strong.

The study details were summarized as follows:

"In the present cross-sectional clinical observational study, the association between Ca-containing dietary supplement use and lesion volumes was investigated in a sample of 227 older adults (60 years and above). Food and supplemental Ca intakes were assessed with the Block 1998 FFQ; participants with supplemental Ca intake above zero were categorised as supplement users. Lesion volumes were determined from cranial MRI (1.5 tesla) scans using a semi-automated technique; volumes were log-transformed because they were non-normal. ANCOVA models revealed that supplement users had greater lesion volumes than non-users, even after controlling for food Ca intake, age, sex, race, years of education, energy intake, depression and hypertension (Ca supplement use: β = 0.34, SE 0.10, F(1,217)= 10.98, P= 0.0011).

 The influence of supplemental Ca use on lesion volume was of a magnitude similar to that of the influence of hypertension, a well-established risk factor for lesions. Among the supplement users, the amount of supplemental Ca was not associated with lesion volume (β = - 0.000035, SE 0.00 015, F(1,139)= 0.06, P= 0.81). The present study demonstrates that the use of Ca-containing dietary supplements, even low-dose supplements, by older adults may be associated with greater lesion volumes. Evaluation of randomised controlled trials is warranted to determine whether this relationship is a causal one.

The researchers concluded their study as follows:

"The use of Ca [calcium] -containing dietary supplements by older adults was found to be associated with greater brain lesion volumes, even after controlling for the usual amount of dietary Ca intake. Interestingly, neither the amount of supplemental Ca nor the duration of supplemental Ca use was associated with lesion volume. These findings indicate that adverse biochemical effects of supplemental Ca use may exist in older adults, regardless of the dose."

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/taking-calcium-supplements-causes-brain-lesions
Tags:

Bob Niland

No Avatar

Join Date: 7/7/2014
Posts Contributed: 10740
Total Likes: 1593
Recommends Recd: 9
Certs & Awards: 39   view

Likes Recd: 1
 
Posted: 4/3/2015 6:56:48 AM
Edited: 4/3/2015 10:28:57 AM (1)
 
Reply Content Hidden!

Post replies longer than 250 characters are restricted to Full Access Members (make certain you are logged-in!).

Sign Up Today!



Tags: